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Article
February 29, 1896

THE PATHOLOGY, ETIOLOGY AND TREATMENT OF PETIT MAL AND GRAND MAL.

Author Affiliations

P. A. SURGEON [RETIRED] U. S. NAVY. MARSHALL, VA.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(9):428-429. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430610030002k

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Abstract

Both of these forms of epilepsy belong with tetanus and hydrophobia to diseases of the nervous system, petit mal, the congenital or mild form occurring in childhood, grand mal, the inherited and acquired, the result of traumatism and developed during some period of adult life. Both present the characteristic features of the malady, viz., irregular action of muscles usually obedient to volition, curtly defined by Cullen, "musculorum convulsio cum sopore." According to the theory of Dr. Carpenter, "Principles of Human Physiology," "the sensory ganglia are the primary seat of that combination of sensibility with spasmodic movements which constitutes epilepsy." The cerebrum also is implicated as occurs by the loss of consciousness preceded by confusion of intellect, impairment of memory and loss of will power over the mental faculties, followed by convulsions and maniacal excitement. There is a marked periodicity, this author adds, in the recurrence of the symptoms. Dr. Todd,

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