[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.87.3. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 14, 1896

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF GRADE, RANK AND TITLE IN THEIR NAVAL MEDICAL RELATIONS.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(11):533-535. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430630035005

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The development of the new Navy is a matter of popular concern and the expensive outlay it involves is acquiesced in by the most exacting appropriation watchers. That the personnel, barely sufficient for a few old time wooden vessels, needs to be similarly expanded in men and officers apace with modern battleships, cruisers and coast-defenders is not questioned, but Washington correspondents declare that Congress finds such difficulty in reconciling the opposing factions of the Navy that in all probability the session will close without any legislation in this direction. It may be profitable for us as physicians to inquire in what manner the interests of our naval medical confrères are affected by this internecine conflict, and who is responsible for obstructing the reorganization which is admittedly necessary.

It is well known that the officers of the Navy have been for many years divided into two bitterly hostile parties—one comprehensively termed

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×