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Article
August 25, 1906

THE NECESSITY FOR BETTER PROVISION FOR LEGAL MEDICINE IN THIS COUNTRY.

JAMA. 1906;XLVII(8):585-587. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.02520080037006

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Abstract

Medical jurisprudence or legal medicine, considered as a distinct discipline, is fast becoming a neglected subject in the American medical curriculum. It is true that many state boards specify a certain amount of instruction in something that is loosely called medical jurisprudence, but it does not appear that the exact field of knowledge that this subject should cover has been accurately defined and, judging from the lists of questions published from time to time by state boards, little or no attention is paid to the subject in the various state examinations for license.

It is also true that many of our medical schools offer brief courses of instruction in medical jurisprudence, but such a thing as a definitely organized department of medical jurisprudence with the necessary laboratory and other special facilities does not appear to exist in any of our medical schools. The actual state of affairs in this respect

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