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Article
April 4, 1896

FRACTURE OF THE FOREARM COMPLICATED WITH DISLOCATION.

Author Affiliations

SURGEON ERIE RAILWAY. SHARON, PA.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(14):656-659. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430660008003a

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Abstract

The mechanism of the human hand, with its great variety of movements and its marvelous adaptability to the purposes for which it is intended, furnishes a strong evidence against the doctrine of those who have doubt as to the origin of man. The best productions of artificial hands, by the highest development of human art yet made, have fallen far short of the natural member, in a mechanical sense, and it is only in that sense that any artificial approximation can be made. The vital principle, emanating from the brain and spine is necessary to the perfection of this organ, and as much as the man, the mechanician or the artist resembles his Creator, he is still unable to control that vital principle, as against natural physiologic activities, and these activities are maintained by the forearm, which may be said to be the dynamo of the hand, and whenever from

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