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Article
March 6, 1897

CHRONIC CATARRHAL GASTRITIS.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE. CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1897;XXVIII(10):439-442. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440100007001a

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Abstract

I desire to call your attention, this morning, to a number of patients who belong to a large class that will confront you during the whole of your active career as medical practitioners.

The first one is a young woman, 25 years of age, who had typhoid fever about a year ago. She had been employed as a shop girl for seven years previous to her illness, but had considered herself in good health till a month before the attack. She says that she was very ill for a period of five weeks and "took a lot of strong medicine." Instead of recovering her normal vigor she has remained thin and feeble. Her heart, lungs, kidneys, spleen, liver and reproductive organs appear to be healthy, but she complains of lack of appetite, epigastric distension, frequent eructation for several hours after eating and constipation of the bowels. She is listless, depressed

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