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Article
October 6, 1906

THE TREND OF PEDIATRIC OPINION CONCERNING THE ARTIFICIAL FEEDING OF INFANTS.

Author Affiliations

Attending Physician, Nursery and Child's Hospital, New York City Children's Hospitals and Schools, Physician Out-Patient Department Babies' Hospital. NEW YORK.

JAMA. 1906;XLVII(14):1083-1086. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.25210140019001e
Abstract

The artificial feeding of infants elicits to-day from our profession an even keener interest than at any time in the past. As a practical science it is making continual progress. A satisfactory working hypothesis having been established some years ago, the spirit of inquiry is now engaged in proving this structure and examining the principles on which it rests. Those portions which do not stand the test are being rapidly replaced by sounder material. Our labor in this direction is far from completed, but it may not be amiss at this time to review somewhat briefly the trend of pediatric opinion concerning certain of these important questions and to recount some of the recent advances.

Foremost among these, because the most fundamental, has been the recognition forced on us by the study of the comparative anatomy and physiology of mammalian species, that milk must be the basis of an infant's

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