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Article
June 18, 1904

THE DEVELOPMENTAL DEFECTS OF THE SKIN AND THEIR MALIGNANT GROWTHS.CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS BEFORE THE SECTION ON CUTANEOUS MEDICINE AND SURGERY, AT THE FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, AT ATLANTIC CITY. JUNE 7-10, 1904.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases, Chicago Policlinic. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(25):1606-1610. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490700006001a
Abstract

The term nevus, originally used by the laity, has been so thoroughly adopted into medical nomenclature to designate congenital blemishes of the skin that any attempt to change or even modify the meaning of the word can only result in confusion, and yet that is the present tendency in dermatology. Unna1 says that it is questionable if nevus linearis will permanently maintain its place among the nevi because of the rapid development which it frequently exhibits in extrauterine life.

Postnatal development of a lesion of intrauterine origin is a striking clinical fact, but it is hardly of sufficient importance to form the basis of classification. There are few malformations of the skin which may not grow rapidly or even present themselves clinically for the first time in adult life.

French authorities use the expression nevus tardive to designate the late developing nevus. Though well understood in France, I have known

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