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Article
March 13, 1897

PECULIARITIES OF THE SURGICAL DISEASES AND INJURIES OF THE NECK.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF ANATOMY AND CLINICAL SURGERY, TULANE UNIVERSITY. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

JAMA. 1897;XXVIII(11):498-501. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440110020002e

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Abstract

Tumors of the thyroid body.  —Gaseous tumors do not exist in the thyroid body. Aerial goitres are really tracheoceles. Cystic tumors are represented especially by hematoma following an injury or due to a hemorrhage in a preexisting cyst either from a traumatism or from a puncture with a too large needle and removal of all the liquid or enough to destroy the equilibrium of the pressure. The cyst originally called a hydrocele is then called a hematocele or a form of angioma. Pulsation in thyroid tumors is not uncommon, owing to the pressure on the great vessels. Lymphangioma represents a form of goitre. Congenital serous cysts of the thyroid are very rare. They must not be confounded any longer with the serous cysts of the neck; the gland is usually atrophied by the cyst, like salivary glands when cysts are located in them. Congenital mixed cysts are the most common;

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