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Article
June 18, 1904

NOTES ON CURETTAGE.WITH REPORT OF A CASE OF ACCIDENTAL PERFORATION OF THE UTERUS.

Author Affiliations

DES MOINES, IOWA.

JAMA. 1904;XLII(25):1620. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92490700020002c
Abstract

At one time the curette was offered as a panacea for nearly every uterine disorder. Indeed, it was often ruthlessly used on the most insignificant provocation, where Nature, with the assistance of a little general treatment, would have sufficed to cure. Retained secundines following abortion and miscarriage may usually be readily removed with the finger. It is not advisable, however, to immediately dilate the uterus in order that the finger may be employed, for in cases in which the organ has become contracted to such an extent that instrumental dilatation becomes necessary, the amount of débris is found to be small, and may readily be removed with the curette. On the other hand, when there is an abundance of foreign tissue in the uterus, its removal with the curette is attended with much difficulty, and one is never sure when the cavity has been emptied.

I recall one instance of an incomplete abortion in which, after having apparently emptied the uterus with the curette, I was about to insert the packing (which was then the practice), when I found that my finger

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