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Article
May 30, 1896

A STUDY OF THE OPERATIVE TREATMENT FOR LOSS OF NERVE SUBSTANCE IN PERIPHERAL NERVES.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(22):1082-1084. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430740034006
Abstract

The far-reaching pathologic changes which result from loss of continuity in the peripheral nerves, and the relative frequency of such injuries, have for many years been the object of much study and research.

Clinical and experimental observations have long ago shown that the function of a severed nerve can be restored if the divided ends are brought into close apposition by means of a suture or otherwise, and that the outlook for a successful result is better the sooner after the injury approximation of the ends is secured. Return of function is possible even without careful suturing of the divided ends, as witness, for instance, the return of a neuralgia after resection of a nerve. The general rule remains, however, that severed nerves must be accurately sutured. Usually injuries to nerves are of such a nature that not much nerve substance is lost, the ends being readily united, but it

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