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October 20, 1906

THE USE OF SODIUM CITRATE AS A MODIFIER OF COW'S MILK.FROM A CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL POINT OF VIEW.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1906;XLVII(16):1241-1243. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.25210160005001a
Abstract

The use of sodium citrate with cow's milk, first recommended by Wright (1893) and later by Poynton (1904), Variot (1904), Vanderslice (1905) and Shaw (1906), has attracted considerable attention, the claim being made that it furnishes an exceedingly valuable method for the treatment of proteid-indigestion and the vomiting of chronic gastric catarrh.

It is entirely apart from the purpose of this paper to discuss the therapeutic aspects of the subject, the purpose being only to consider the chemical and physical facts in relation thereto.

The chemical ground has been taken by the earlier investigators that the addition of sodium citrate to milk resulted, on contact with the gastric juice, in the decomposition of the calcium-casein of the milk, with the precipitation of insoluble calcium citrate, and the separation of the casein in a more flocculent form than ordinarily obtains. But Shaw's experiments have clearly demonstrated that such is not the

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