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Article
June 20, 1896

A SAFE METHOD BY WHICH ANESTHETICS MAY BE ADMINISTERED WITH OXYGEN.

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN, N. Y.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(25):1211-1214. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430770013001d

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Abstract

Since the discovery of the application of ether by Dr. Morton, of Boston, and its first use in the Massachusetts General Hospital by the late Dr. J. C. Warren as an anesthetic in 1846, there has been a great desire that some means should be devised by which all danger might be allayed, so that the patient could not be rendered cyanotic, especially when there was disease of the heart or kidneys that complicated the patient's condition. While ether has had the preference to chloroform in our country, yet in Europe the latter has been more universally used, and at the present day is also being adopted for anesthetic purposes in many private sanitariums, either alone or in the A. C. E. mixture.

Among the advantages derived from the use of chloroform are that it requires a much smaller amount to produce anesthesia, the patient becomes unconscious more rapidly and

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