[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.163.158.163. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 20, 1896

NERVOUS SHOCK AND DISEASE OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM AS A CAUSE OF PERNICIOUS ANEMIA.

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(25):1216-1219. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430770018001f
Abstract

It is the object of this paper to direct attention to nervous shock or disease of the nervous system as a possible, or probable, exciting cause of grave or pernicious anemia. My attention was called to the relations between these conditions by the following case:

The patient, Mrs. M., white, 63 years of age, claimed to have been in good health up to November, 1893. She had rosy cheeks, was plump, weighed 137 pounds, led an active, busy life as a quasi-practitioner of medicine. She scarcely knew what it was to be confined to bed save when her children were born, five of whom she had brought into the world alive and healthy. She had never miscarried and there was no other evidence leading to the suspicion of syphilis. Her father had lived to the age of 87, to die an accidental death. Her mother succumbed to pleurisy at 63.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×