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Article
June 27, 1896

LYCOPERSICUM CARDIOPATHIA.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS IN MEDICAL DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA AND CONSULTANT IN CHEST DISEASES IN THE SOUTH SIDE HOSPITAL, PITTSBURG, PA.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(26):1255-1258. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430780007001d

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Abstract

The lycopersicum esculentum, natural order of solanaceae, indigenous to South America, is a vining plant with irregular sessated leaves, bearing fruit of various shapes and colors. It is also known as the "love apple," but more commonly is called the "tomato." It was introduced into America in the latter part of the sixteenth century as an ornamental natural curiosity, and was found only in the conservatories of the wealthy. On account of its peculiar beauty it was subsequently taken to Europe. The fruit was considered poisonous to the human, but was observed to be eaten by lower animals. This fact excited Yankee curiosity and it was tested and adopted as an article of diet in some sections of America. It was not until the beginning of the civil war that its acceptance as an edible food became general. Europe has not up to the present given it general welcome as

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