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Article
June 27, 1896

THE EFFECT OF ALCOHOL ON THE ORGANS OF SPECIAL SENSE.

JAMA. 1896;XXVI(26):1258-1262. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430780010001e
Abstract

No extended argument is needed to demonstrate the effect on the organs of special sense1 of alcohol in large quantities, sufficiently large to destroy temporarily the functions of these organs.

Any person in the condition in which he may be properly called "dead drunk" is completely narcotized. His entire nervous system is paralyzed. He may have taken a half pint or a pint of whisky or brandy. Either of these amounts is a large quantity, the former for a child, the latter for an adult.

The person overcome by a complete alcoholic stupor has lost for the time being the functions of the special senses. Speak in stentorian voice to the victim of such a condition and he gives no sign of the existence of the sense of hearing; expose his eyeballs to a bright light and the pupils give no response to indicate the presence of vision; prick

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