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Article
July 25, 1896

SYMPTOMS, DIAGNOSIS AND TIME FOR OPERATION IN RUPTURED TUBAL PREGNANCY.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(4):196-199. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430820024003d

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Abstract

Careful study of the physiologic, anatomic and pathologic conditions of cases coming within our experience, while such study has not altogether removed from controversy very many subjects connected with gynecology, it has led some of us to positive convictions and to the adoption of well defined lines of practice. We are concerning ourselves less about theories, though we are not able to dispense with them altogether, but we are growing to base our rules of practice more upon the results of our observations and experiences. Pathologic systems are continually changing, one system succeeding another in quickand confusing succession. There should be no element of mere conjecture in our every day working experience. After the surgeon has discovered and relieved conditions which his experience, his observation, has taught him to detect with almost mathematical certainty, the pathologist can step in and display his science in explaining cause and effect.

The occurrence

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