[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.168.21. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 25, 1896

HOW TO CURE RHEUMATISM.

Author Affiliations

Vice-President American Academy of Medicine; Chairman Section on State Medicine American Medical Association. Chicago.

JAMA. 1896;XXVII(4):202-205. doi:10.1001/jama.1896.02430820030003f

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The names of diseases are determined, principally by the prominence of a certain group of symptoms. The disease under consideration follows the general rule. Special names are attributed to particular groups of symptoms, all of which, however, constitute merely varieties of one disease.

Rheumatism is acute when it is recent, and chronic when the disease has extended over a longer period; articular, when the manifestation is chiefly in the joints; inflammatory, when the whole body exhibits the symptoms of inflammation and pain; muscular, when relating to the striated and non-striated tissues; sciatica and lumbago belong to the same family; even gout is itself closely related in its orgin, differing only in its symptomatology.

The present paper is concerned with a practical review of the author's system of managing this disease in its various forms.

Disturbance of nutrition with consequent impairment of the solids and fluids of the body, always precede

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×