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Article
November 17, 1906

ETHER-AIR ANESTHESIA OR THE DROP METHOD FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF ETHER.FROM AN EXPERIENCE OF SIX HUNDRED AND FIFTY CASES.

Author Affiliations

Staff Anesthetist to the Mount Sinai Hospital. CLEVELAND, OHIO.

JAMA. 1906;XLVII(20):1653-1655. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.25210200049002b
Abstract

In the United States ether is generally the anesthetic of election, and in this country, at least, its administration is conceded to be attended with less danger than that of chloroform. The universal method for the administration of ether is by means of the Allis or similar cone, and a universal principle governing its administration is that it should be given with the least possible amount of air.

From the manner in which ether is generally administered by the cone, except when given by a skilled anesthetist, there is produced, besides the anesthetic effect, one of partial asphyxiation.

To exclude all fresh air by using a closed cone and wrapping a towel around the chin and the cone, to prevent the escape of the inhaled vapors and to force the re-inhalation of these vapors without admitting any fresh air, is to produce a partial asphyxiation.

Ordinarily the ether is poured

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