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Article
November 24, 1906

A PATHOLOGIC STUDY OF SEVEN CASES OF PARALYSIS WITHOUT GROSS ANATOMIC CHANGE.

JAMA. 1906;XLVII(21):1713-1717. doi:10.1001/jama.1906.25210210021001e

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Abstract

Notwithstanding all these studies the cause of uremic hemiplegia has not been satisfactorily explained. One is forced to the conclusion that it may be due not to any one cause in all cases, but to one of a number of causes; in some cases, perhaps, to autointoxication; in others to edema or arteriosclerosis; and in still others to the presence of microscopic areas of necrosis which have been described in this paper.

Some confusion seems to exist as to what really constitutes uremic hemiplegia. It is a mistake to diagnose all cases of one-sided paralysis occurring in a subject who suffers from chronic kidney disease, uremic paralysis. Strictly speaking, a diagnosis of uremic paralysis should be restricted to those cases which develop during uremia, transient palsy, or a palsy which may persist to the end in fatal cases. There is no way, however, that I know of, by which it

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