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Article
February 2, 1907

JOINT AFFECTIONS IN NERVOUS DISEASE.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University. BALTIMORE, MD.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(5):384-387. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220310008001c
Abstract

America has the honor of having first seriously directed the attention of the medical world to the intimate relation between disease of the joints and of the nervous system. Since Dr. John Keasley Mitchell1 wrote his suggestive articles in 1831 and 1833 our knowledge of this relation has made remarkable progress.

If we leave out of consideration the atrophic joints and limbs of the cerebral and spinal palsies of children and the joint changes in acromegaly the most important joint affections in nervous disease fall into the following groups:

  1. The intermittent joint effusions (hydrops articulorum intermittens).

  2. The arthropathies of tabes and dementia paralytica (arthropathia tabetica).

  3. The syringomyelic arthropathies (arthropathia syringomyelica).

  4. The painful joints of the psychoneurotics (arthral-algia psychoneurotica).

THE REGULARLY INTERMITTENT JOINT EFFUSIONS 

(Hydrops Articulorum Intermittens).  This remarkable affection early described by Moore2 has been carefully studied in this country by Kennedy,3 Barnes,4 Brackett and Cotton

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