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Article
February 2, 1907

THE FENESTRATED BROAD LIGAMENT CLAMP.WITH SOME REASONS FOR DEVISING IT.

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Rush Medical College and Policlinic Postgraduate School; Assistant Gynecologist, Presbyterian, Policlinic and Deaconess' Hospitals. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(5):419-420. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220310043003b

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Abstract

The idea of devising a new clamp occurred to me in consequence of the force necessary and trauma often caused while clamping infiltrated, inextensible and stiffened broad ligaments during salpingectomy or oöphorosalpingectomy, especially in cases where the abdominal walls were markedly thick, even though exposure were made by a longer median incision than usual.

To ligate before removing the tube in cases of sactosalpinx purulenta also has the disadvantage of manipulating an infectious pus sac, with the possibility of rupture, as well as occupying more time than clamping, excision and ligation.

Observations of cases of pus tubes in various stages has demonstrated that we may almost speak of the mechanism of the formation of the pus tube even if the findings differ widely in different cases.

The normally situated tube under conditions of purulent inflammation undergoes increase in size, length and weight, especially at the distal or fimbriated extremity, tending

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