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Article
February 2, 1907

GRADUATE WORK IN EUROPE FOR THE AVERAGE AMERICAN PHYSICIAN.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(5):425. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.02520310049009
Abstract

There is a tendency for American medical practitioners to go abroad for advanced work immediately after graduation. In some cases this step is taken purely with the view of acquiring that elusive something which we call prestige; the majority of those who go, however, really do so with the idea of deriving material benefit from thus "rounding off" their education. A contemporary1 makes a timely protest against this custom, pointing out that the average American-born physician —for example, one who chooses to go to Germany— is so "steeped in American thought and American social conditions" that in the short period abroad he is unable to derive benefit from the contact with German medical science. The recent medical graduate, no matter how strongly convinced to the contrary, is seldom in a condition to know what he wants in the way of graduate instruction. To this uncertainty add foreign methods and

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