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Article
February 16, 1907

A SERIES OF MEDICAL AND SURGICAL AFFECTIONS TREATED BY ARTIFICIAL AUTOINOCULATIONACCORDING TO WRIGHT'S THEORY OF OPSONINS.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(7):571-577. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220330013001c
Abstract

It is somewhat surprising, in view of the remarkable character of the results which have been obtained, that an appreciation of the full value of Sir A. E. Wright's theory and practice is not widely disseminated among the medical profession of the United States. Rarely, indeed, in these days of easy publicity, does a scientist effect an accomplishment of far-reaching humanitarian importance without its immediate and extensive proclamation throughout the civilized world. In fact, such proclamation, especially of discoveries in the healing art, is too often premature and over-colored, with the result that disappointment and pessimism are aroused and progress impeded. With Professor Wright, however, the situation is quite the opposite. He has for four or five years patiently worked along a new line in experimental medicine, has evolved an attractive working hypothesis, the application of which has performed veritable miracles in the cure of certain diseases, and all of

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