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Article
September 17, 1904

THE PRIMARY SEAT OF INFECTION IN FATAL CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(12):818-819. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.02500120054015
Abstract

It is a matter of no small difficulty to determine the primary seat of infection in many cases of tuberculosis. The age of the lesions can not always be accurately estimated from either their intensity or their extent. The question at issue has, however, distinct practical significance, inasmuch as the prophylactic measures to be instituted must be based on the decisionreached. With the view of establishing the relative frequency with which the abdominal and the thoracic viscera respectively are invaded primarily, Dr. J. Odery Symes and Dr. Theodore Fisher1 have analyzed the postmortem records of 500 cases in which death took place as a result of tuberculosis. They found that, of 102 cases in patients under the age of 12 years, 12 appeared to be definitely abdominal in origin and 57 definitely thoracic in origin, while in 24 there was doubt as to whether the origin was abdominal or

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