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October 1, 1904

PHYSIOLOGIC EXTIRPATION OF THE GANGLION OF GASSER.FURTHER REPORT ON DIVISION OF THE SENSORY ROOT FOR TIC DOULOUREUX, BASED ON THE OBSERVATIONS OF FOUR CASES.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Surgery, University of Pennsylvania; Surgeon to the university Hospital; Professor of Neuropathology and Associate Professor of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania. PHILADELPHIA.; From the William Pepper Laboratory of Clinical Medicine (Phæbe A. Hearst Foundation).

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(14):943-947. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500140001e
Abstract

REMARKS BY DR. FRAZIER.  In June, 1901, three years ago, I reported to the Section on Surgery of the American Medical Association then in session at St. Paul, the results of a series of experiments on dogs conducted by Dr. Spilier and myself, with a view toward determining the feasib of dividing the sensory root of the gasserian ganglion for the relief of tic douloureux.

RESUME OF EXPERIMENTAL WORK.  These experiments consisted in carrying out this operation on a number of dogs and subjecting the structures removed several months later to a rigid histologic examination to determine whether regeneration of the sensory root after simple division could occur. The results of these investigations admitted of but one interpretation, namely, that there was not the slightest evidence of regeneration within the central nervous system. More recently,1 Dr. Spiller and myself pursued this line of investigation in a series of

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