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Article
March 23, 1907

CONJUGATE DEVIATION OF THE EYES AND HEAD AND DISORDERS OF THE ASSOCIATED OCULAR MOVEMENTSIN TUMORS AND OTHER LESIONS OF THE CEREBRUM.

Author Affiliations

Instructor In Nervous Diseases and Neuropathology, University of Pennsylvania; Assistant Neurologist to the Philadelphia General Hospital. PHILADELPHIA.

From the Department of Neurology and the Laboratory of Neuropathology, University of Pennsylvania.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(12):1003-1009. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220380019001d
Abstract

VARIOUS VIEWS DISCUSSED.  Within the past two years the causes of conjugate deviation of the eyes and head have repeatedly been the subject of controversy, especially by certain French writers. In 1904, Bard1 advanced the sensorial theory of conjugate deviation, although this had been spoken of previously by Roux.2. This theory has since been ably supported, especially by Dufour,3 and opposed by Grasset,4 Dejerine and Roussy,5 and others.Chiefly through the kindness of Dr. Charles K. Mills and Dr. William G. Spiller I have had the opportunity to study 16 cases of conjugate deviation of the eyes and head, 15 of which are with necropsy, and I have attempted to come to such conclusions as to the causes of conjugate deviation of the eyes and head as the evidence in these cases will permit, together with the aid of cases in the literature.Disorders of

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