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Article
March 23, 1907

THE VALUE OF SULPHATES IN CARBOLIC-ACID POISONING.

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND, OHIO.

From the Pharmacological Laboratory of Western Reserve University.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(12):1015-1019. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220380031001h
Abstract

HISTORICAL DATA.  The treatment of phenol poisoning by sulphates dates from the observation of Baumann,1 in 1876, that a considerable proportion of the phenol is excreted in the urine as the practically harmless phenol-sulphonic (sulphocarbolic) acid, C6H4(OH)SO3H, or, rather, as the salts of this acid with the urine bases. Baumann suggested that this constitutes a natural mechanism for the disintoxication of phenol. Since only a part of the phenol is excreted in this form, it seems reasonable to suppose that the quantity of sulphate at the disposal of the body was not sufficient to combine with all the phenol, and that the efficiency of the mechanism could, therefore, be increased by the administration of sulphates. Baumann tested this suggestion on two dogs, painting the phenol on the skin. The result was in agreement with the theory, although it was not sufficiently rigorous to

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