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Article
March 23, 1907

ETIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY OF TRAUMATIC RUPTURE OF THE ABDOMINAL VISCERA.

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Surgery, Rush Medical College, University of Chicago. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(12):1021-1026. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220380037001j
Abstract

The abdominal viscera, while not exposed to such infrequent injury as the extremities, are of far greater importance as regards the life of the patient. The diagnosis of such injuries is often difficult, and time is of such great importance that a quick decision, followed by aggressive surgery in the proper cases, has in recent years made the prognosis much more hopeful. The etiology has an important bearing in making at least a probable diagnosis, such an important factor in meeting this grave pathologic condition. Either hemorrhage, shock or peritonitis is apt to follow, as a natural course, rupture of any of the abdominal organs.

SPLEEN.  The spleen is a ductless gland situated in the left hypochondriac region at the tail of the pancreas and behind the peritoneum. It weighs five to eight ounces and is of about the same size at birth, not increasing in proportion to the body.

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