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Article
October 15, 1904

DISEASES OF THE GALL BLADDER AND BILE DUCTS IN RELATION TO DISEASES OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(16):1105-1108. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500160001b
Abstract

Owing to the close anatomic proximity of the gall bladder and bile ducts to certain portions of the gastrointestinal tract, disease of one of these structures may be readily transmitted to the other. The symptoms arising from disease of these parts are often hopelessly confused, as illustrated by the difficulty at times in differentiating cholelithiasis and gastric ulcer. No wonder, for, as Fleiner states in effect, one may well say gallstone disease may not only simulate all of the diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, but it may produce them, namely, stomach cramp, intestinal colic, vomiting, diarrhea, bloody vomit, bloody stools, symptoms of ulcer, actual ulceration, tumor, stenosis of the pylorus, duodenum and colon, gastric hypersecretion and tetany.

The disorders of the stomach and intestine arising from disease of the gall bladder and bile ducts may be conveniently divided into those nervous or reflex in origin, and those due to a direct extension of the anatomic disease.

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