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Article
April 6, 1907

SOME WELL-KNOWN SYNTHETIC CHEMICALS AND THEIR RELATION TO THE PURE FOOD AND DRUGS ACT.

Author Affiliations

Chief of the Drug Laboratory, Department of Agriculture; Member of the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry, American Medical Association WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(14):1175-1177. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220400027001h
Abstract

The word "synthetic," as used in the chemical world, means a combination of separate substances, elements or radicals, which result in the formation of definite chemicals. The manufacture of acetanilid from benzol, or antipyrin from anilin, affords good illustrations, inasmuch as in the manufacture of both several operations are necessary. The word "synthetic," however, has acquired an entirely different meaning, which has been used to a considerable extent in the past, usually in an honorable manner, but often for the purpose of deceiving not only the public, but physicians as well. This feature has been claiming recognition in no unmistakable terms during the past few months. It is held by some that the mixing together of the various cinchona alkaloidal salts, in proportion as found by analysis of the cinchona barks, the same dissolved in simple elixir and colored with caramel, is a "synthetic elixir of cinchona bark." Other illustrations

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