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Article
October 22, 1904

THE FAMILY PHYSICIANAS A FACTOR IN THE SOLUTION OF THE TUBERCULOSIS PROBLEM.

Author Affiliations

Associate Director of the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases of the Health Department; Visiting Physician to the Riverside Sanatorium for Consumptives of the City of New York; Hon. Director of the Gaylord Farm Sanatorium at Wallingford, Conn.; Consulting Physician to Sanatorium Gabriels, Gabriels, N. Y., and the Consumption Hospital of West Mountain, Scranton, Pa. NEW YORK.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(17):1196-1200. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500170001c
Abstract

In choosing this subject as a contribution to the Section on Practice of Medicine of our great Association. I have borne in mind that this Section is composed mainly of general practitioners; that is to say, family physicians. Before outlining what can and should be done by the family physician as a factor in the solution of the tuberculosis problem, you will permit me to give you my conception of what the family physician should be and what he should represent in a civilized country and in this enlightened century.

Of late there has been in the minds of the laity and even among the profession a tendency to depreciate the value and the standing of the general practitioner. In the profession this tendency has been particularly pronounced among its younger members; the result is that the number of family physicians relative to the number of specialists and also relative

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