[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 29, 1904

A CHIEF PREDISPOSING CAUSE OF APPENDICITIS.A PRELIMINARY NOTE WITH A FEW LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS.

Author Affiliations

[From the Pathological Laboratories, Rush Medical College, University of Chicago.] CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(18):1307-1309. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500180001i
Abstract

One evening in the fall of last year I was called to the bedside of a man who had suddenly become ill with symptoms typical of acute appendicitis, viz., chills, nausea and vomiting, general abdominal pain and local tenderness over the ileocecal region. The patient's history was as follows:

An American, of German extraction, 40 years of age, unmarried, stenographer, almost a total abstainer, and of excellent habits in general. Family history excellent. He has always been well, with the exception of a diarrhea several months ago, of a few weeks' duration, from which he made a complete recovery. For a week or so preceding his last illness he was troubled with flatulency, though it caused him slight inconvenience.

After remaining in bed for ten days, and with appropriate medical treatment, the patient made an uneventful recovery from appendicitis.

In considering the case in all its bearings, but especially with

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×