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Article
April 27, 1907

THE DIGESTION OF THE PROTEIDS OF COW'S MILK IN INFANCY.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(17):1389-1392. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220430001001

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Abstract

The proteids in cow's milk give rise to no digestive or nutritive disturbances in the feeding of young infants. If the foregoing statement be a fact, and I am convinced that it is, then the theories and practices that now hold the American profession with regard to the artificial feeding of infants must be radically altered. For years the idea of proteid indigestibility has existed, based principally on some crude test-tube experiments and the misappreciation of certain appearances of the baby's stools, and this error has lived because none challenged the hypothesis, but everybody accepted the casein indigestion as an easy explanation of the difficult digestion of cow's milk during infancy. However, such a mass of incontrovertible evidence has been presented by Escherich, Heubner and Rubner, Budan, Finkelstein and more especially by Czerny and Keller, that one must now admit that such a thing as the proteid indigestion of cow's

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