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Article
April 27, 1907

GLEANINGS FROM FOUR YEARS' EXPERIENCE IN THE CORRELATION OF CLINICAL AND RADIO-DIAGNOSTIC FINDINGS.

Author Affiliations

Instructor of Medicine, University of California; Director of the Roentgen Ray Department, Lane Hospital; Adjunct Visiting Physician, German Hospital; Visiting Physician, City and County Hospital. SAN FRANCISCO.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(17):1392-1397. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220430004001a

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Abstract

During the past four years I have consistently employed as a diagnostic aid the x-ray in the field of internal medicine, and this in hospital, private and consultation work. The method followed was routined, thus: A thorough clinical examination was first made and a tentative diagnosis formed, then a radiogram was taken and, if necessary, the fluoroscope used; if the clinical and radiographic evidences did not tally, the patients were re-examined, special attention being directed to the discrepancy. Thus the clinical and radiographic pictures were finally correlated and the previous errors noted. It frequently happened that many clinicians had the opportunity of seeing the same patient and of forming tentative opinions: internes, those seeking postgraduate instruction, general practitioners and hospital physicians. In such event the varied errors were recorded.

The first year's work served to develop sufficient skill in the use of the x-ray to make it of service

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