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Article
May 4, 1907

THE FIELD WHEREIN THE WORK OF THE SURGEON APPROACHES THAT OF THE PHYSICIAN.

Author Affiliations

Surgeon to St. Joseph's, Wise Memorial and Presbyterian Hospitals. OMAHA.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(18):1478-1480. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220440010001b

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Abstract

Cases in which a reasonable doubt exists as to the propriety of an operation are met sufficiently often to warrant their consideration.

THE SURGEON AND THE PHYSICIAN.  The training, character of practice and experience of the general surgeon differ in a measure from those of the internist—their observations being made from a different point of view, but their conclusions, when based on all of the evidence, should agree.The experienced surgeon possesses an advantage from his opportunities to inspect and to palpate the living tissues and to study the pathology in its various degrees of severity and stages of progress and to compare such findings with the pre-operative symptoms. Repeatedly thus to study the symptoms before operation, and to check up the findings revealed by the exploration, contributes in the most practical way to the development of his judgment.The relatively greater experience of the internist in his study of

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