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Article
May 4, 1907

THE STATE BOARD AND THE COLLEGE DIPLOMA.

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(18):1480-1483. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220440012001c
Abstract

One of the most interesting and significant features in the development of modern medical education is the relation between the state medical examining and licensing board and the medical school. As has been shown elsewhere,1 there is reasonable ground for the belief that the state board sprang only from a soil mulched with the product of the decadent medical school. To put the point more bluntly, had the medical school done its full duty, there would never have been need of the state board; for the diploma of such a school would have satisfied all registration requirements. It must be conceded, therefore, at the very outset, that the state board begins its functions with a natural, not to say genetic, prejudice against the medical school per se.

In the prehistoric days of the profession, before the rise of the schools, its neophytes were the accredited apprentices of recognized practitioners.

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