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Article
May 4, 1907

REPORT OF A CASE OF REMOVAL OF THE GANGLION OF THE FIFTH NERVE FOR TIC DOULOUREUX.FOLLOWED BY PARALYSIS OF THE SEVENTH NERVE ON THE SAME SIDE.

Author Affiliations

Surgeon to Hope Hospital; Professor of Surgery in the Medical Department of Purdue University. FORT WAYNE, IND.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(18):1504-1505. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220440036002

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Abstract

All cases of excision of the ganglion of the fifth nerve should be reported because of the comparative rarity of the operation; but an additional interest attaches itself to the case here reported because of the motor paralysis which followed.

History.  —F. P., male, aged 32, had little of note in his personal or family history, except that his father was an alcoholic. The patient lived for a time in Arkansas, but had to move on account of malaria. He was unable to take quinin for this disease, as the drug produced a severe hematuria. He commenced having attacks of pain in the spring of 1889. For these attacks he was treated medicinally and without relief. He also had most of his teeth extracted without, of course, any good resulting therefrom. In 1904 the superior maxillary branch of the fifth nerve was excised; the operation gave him relief for a

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