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Article
November 5, 1904

THE FUNCTION OF THE THYROID AND THE PARATHYROIDS.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(19):1399. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.02500190051006
Abstract

It is well known that total extirpation of the thyroid, as for the relief of goiter, is followed by a peculiar symptom-complex which is called cachexia strumipriva. The symptoms resemble those of myxedema, in which disease there is a great increase of connective tissue in and beneath the skin. The skin becomes thick and dry and the hair falls off. The features are swollen and heavy and the movements clumsy and trembling. The mental powers also gradually deteriorate, and the patient becomes slow and stupid and finally imbecile. In carnivorous animals, as cats and dogs, more acute symptoms are seen after total removal of the thyroid, and the animal usually dies within the first month after the operation. The first symptoms generally are tetanic spasms and more or less severe convulsions. These convulsions may appear as early as the end of the first day, and may last for weeks, but

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