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Article
November 12, 1904

IS CESAREAN SECTION A RATIONAL METHOD OF TREATMENT IN PLACENTA PREVIA?

Author Affiliations

Professor of Obstetrics, Medical Department Georgetown University; Obstetrician to Columbia, Georgetown University Hospital, Etc. WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(20):1444-1448. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500200001d
Abstract

The importance of this subject is not from its frequency, but from the emergency of the situation, which demands early recognition and prompt decision by the physician, in that it involves the lives of both mother and unborn child, and, as regards himself, points of professional honor and conscience. In the complications that confront the obstetrician there is none that is fraught with more danger or attended with greater anxiety than placenta previa, save, perhaps, eclampsia. Its sudden onset, often alarming hemorrhage and consequent anemia, shock, and possible sepsis present a formidable array of difficulties that even in the hands of the most skillful has been attended with a high maternal and fetal mortality. It is true that in recent years, with more definite method of treatment and advances in asepsis and antisepsis, the maternal death rate has been greatly lessened, but the extraordinarily high proportion of infants lost remains

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