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Article
November 19, 1904

RETARDED ERUPTION OF THE TEETH; THEIR LIBERATION OR EXTRACTION.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(21):1522-1529. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500210001c
Abstract

In order to fully understand this subject one should first be thoroughly familiar with the typical positions of the teeth when entirely erupted and in normal occlusion with those of the opposing jaw. It is also necessary to have a complete knowledge of the internal anatomy of the alveolar process. Therefore, a few illustrations showing the typically erupted teeth, with their occlusion, and the internal anatomy of the alveolar processes will be shown.

Figure 1 is a side view made from an almost perfect skull of a white woman. The teeth are fully erupted and are almost typical in their position and occlusion. It is evident there has been but little interference with the nutrition of either the jaws or the teeth of this subject. It will be noticed that the mental foramen is on a line drawn vertically downward from between the premolar teeth. This is quite typical and

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