[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.168.21. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 19, 1904

THE INFLUENCE OF INTESTINAL BACTERIA ON THE PROPERTIES OF THE BLOOD SERUM.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(21):1557. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.02500210047014
Abstract

The study of the absorption of bacteria or bacterial products from the intestinal canal has both an academic and a practical interest. Although it is known from the work of Nuttall and Thierfelder that the presence of bacteria in the intestinal canal is not necessary to life, the practical fact remains that bacteria in enormous numbers are always present in this situation. Whether these bacteria are of any use in the economy—and it is conceivable that their products might aid in the digestive process—is still unknown. On the other hand, there seems good reason to believe that bacteria which are normal inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tract, and which, under normal circumstances, do no harm, may, under certain conditions, become pathogenic. This certainly seems to be the case so far as the colon bacillus is concerned, and, as is well known, this organism inhabits the intestines in enormous numbers. It seems

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×