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Article
June 1, 1907

EXTENSIVE MULTIPLE KELOIDS.THREE CASES IN CHINAMEN FOLLOWING THE HABITUAL HYPODERMIC USE OF MORPHIN.

Author Affiliations

Late Pathologist, Bureau of Science, Manila, P. I. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(22):1844-1849. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220480022002e
Abstract

Keloid is a pathologic process of the skin, somewhat doubtful as to its nosologic classification, but generally looked on as a connective tissue neoplasm, closely allied to, though separate and distinct from ordinary fibromata. The name of this skin affection—keloid—was first used by Alibert,1 and it should correctly be spelled cheloid, being derived from χηλή, a crab's claw.

The etiology of keloid to-day is still ill understood; we do know, however, that this morbid process frequently follows comparatively insignificant trauma of the skin and that it appears to require a special susceptibility or predisposition, either purely personal or racial, in the individuals in whom it develops. Pricks of the skin with small instruments, common needles or tattooing needles have frequently been noticed as the starting points of keloid formation. However, I have failed to find in the literature reports of cases of the development of multiple keloids in consequence of

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