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June 8, 1907

MENINGOCOCCUS SEPTICEMIA.DEMONSTRATION OF THE MENINGOCOCCUS IN THE BLOOD SMEAR.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Clinical Diagnosis at the Baltimore Medical College. BALTIMORE.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(23):1938-1940. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220490030002b
Abstract

The number of cases of meningococcus infection in which the organism has been found in the blood is as yet rather small, and the one described below, in which it could be demonstrated directly in the blood smear taken from the ear, so far as I have been able to ascertain, is the only one now on record.

Patient.  —A man, aged 27, whose family and previous personal history contained nothing of importance. He had been in good health until the night of March 19, when he complained of pain in the head and neck and also in the joints and muscles. He was nauseated, but did not vomit. Within the next days the headache became progressively worse and very severe. There had been no distinct chill, but fever up to 104 F.

Examination.  —He was admitted to Dr. Futcher's1 service at the St. Agnes Hospital at 11:30 p. m.

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