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Article
June 15, 1907

CATARACT EXTRACTION.I. IS THE CASE OPERABLE? II. PREPARATION OF THE PATIENT. III. THE ANESTHETIC.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(24):2003-2005. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220500009002
Abstract

I. IS THE CASE OPERABLE?  In opening this subject I fear that I have little to give that is new or even interesting. The question whether a case is operable must be decided from three standpoints—that of the general health of the patient, the condition of the eye and its surroundings and the state of the cataract itself. There has been, as far as I know, but little recent change in the accepted views on these points. Chronic heart, lung and kidney disease and diabetes are no longer considered bars to operation, provided the patient is put into the best general condition which his disease will permit, and also provided, of course, that this condition justifies the operation. Coughing reduced by treatment to a minimum, the inability to lie down in bed and other necessary concomitants of the diseases mentioned are not as important as the estimate of the general

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