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Article
June 15, 1907

THE INCISION FOR THE EXTRACTION OF CATARACT AND THE IRIDECTOMY.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(24):2005-2011. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220500011002a
Abstract

In studying the incision employed for the extraction of cataract we need not go further back in the history of the incision than the time of Daviel.1 The operation of extraction, as a recognized method of removing cataract originated with Daviel, the method having been matured about the year 1750.

The incision employed most frequently by Daviel and the one referred to when the term "Daviel's incision" is used is a flap incision (Fig. 1) made entirely in the corneal tissue close to the scleral margin. The cornea was first pierced by means of a broad needle at its lower margin; then, by means of small, blunt-pointed knives and by curved scissors (Daviel's scissors, right and left), the incision was continued on either side until almost two-thirds of the cornea near its margin had been divided. In the latter years of Daviel's life the incision was made shorter. In

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