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Article
June 15, 1907

THE DELIVERY OF THE LENS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF CATARACT; IRRIGATION OF THE ANTERIOR CHAMBER, AND THE FIRST TOILET OF THE WOUND.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1907;XLVIII(24):2011-2016. doi:10.1001/jama.1907.25220500017002b
Abstract

The second stage toward the successful completion in cataract operations depends, first, on the length and character of the corneal incision; second, on the laceration of the capsule or the removal of the lens within its capsule through the opening in the cornea. The importance of the amplitude of the incision is so well known to all ophthalmic surgeons that, in his symposium, Dr. Weeks has undertaken to embellish this part of our subject with the care and precision which characterize all his writings on ophthalmology. Dr. E. E. Landolt of Paris has recently written an historical review of all the work done on this subject in a monograph of 130 pages.1 So, with Dr. Weeks on this side of the Atlantic and Dr. Landolt on the other, the ophthalmic world will be made thoroughly conversant with all that can be said or written on that delicate incision in

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