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Article
January 8, 1898

IMPLANTATION OF A GLASS BALL FOR THE SUPPORT OF AN ARTIFICIAL EYE AND MULES' OPERATION FOR THE SUBSTITUTION OF ENUCLEATION OF AN EYEBALL.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(2):65-66. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440540013002c
Abstract

The satisfactory results attending evisceration for the better support of an artificial eye have led me to implant a glass or silver ball in those cases where the eyeball had been enucleated at an earlier period.

After an enucleation, and the artificial eye is adjusted, we have the objectionable enophthalmus and a fixed eyeball stare. Owing to the sinking of the artificial eye the secretions are retained in the cul-desac and in a short time we have the muco-purulent discharge, which adhere to the margin of the lids and also crust the anterior portion of the artificial eye, rendering the wearing of it most objectionable.

It was to overcome these objections that Mr. Adams Frost of London, in 1886, practiced the insertion of a glass ball immediately after enucleation of an eyeball. His method was as follows: After incising the conjunctiva all around the cornea, each rectus muscle was raised

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