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Article
December 31, 1904

A PLEA FOR MORE THOROUGH EXAMINATION OF DOUBTFUL SPECIMENS OF ECTOPIC PREGNANCY.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Gynecology, Columbian University; Ex-President Southern Surgical and Gynecological Association; President Washington Obstetrical and Gynecological Society. WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1904;XLIII(27):2012. doi:10.1001/jama.1904.92500270002
Abstract

Every abdominal surgeon meets with cases in which, before or during operation, the diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy is made, but in which no fetus or placenta is found. In such, absence of the fetus is attributed to the rapid absorptive action of the peritoneum on the nearly boneless ovum, and the absence of the placenta to interruption of the pregnancy before the development of that structure is commonly understood to begin. It is now known, however, that the trophoblast enters into the formation of that structure early in the developmental stage of segregation or cell division. In observing the work of others, I am sure this diagnosis is adhered to even without microscopic examination, if blood, either loose or encysted, is found in the peritoneal cavity, and a tube or ovary, or both, distended by blood coagulum. In my own experience, several times I have found that microscopic examination

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