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Article
January 8, 1898

A REPORT OF THIRTY CASES OF CATARACT EXTRACTION WITH REFERENCE TO THE TREATMENT OF PROLAPSE OF IRIS FOLLOWING SIMPLE EXTRACTION.

Author Affiliations

OPHTHALMIC SURGEON TO ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL, ETC. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1898;XXX(2):80-81. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.72440540028002j

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Abstract

Undoubtedly the ideal method of cataract extraction is that in which the lens is removed without iridectomy. But in view of the much better results obtainable by the average operator with iridectomy I am inclined to think that simple extraction should be reserved for selected cases. Certainly it is safe to say that young operators should always use the combined method and wait until their judgment and skill are considerable before attempting simple extraction. The adoption of strict asepsis and antisepsis by the modern ophthalmic surgeon has, no doubt, made simple extraction of cataract more popular at the present day; but the great drawback still remains in the liability of prolapse of the iris coming on after the operation. On my return from Europe two years ago I determined to adopt simple extraction. Twenty out of thirty cataract cases were consecutively operated upon without iridectomy, and in four of them

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