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July 19, 1890

AMERICAN VERSUS EUROPEAN MEDICAL EDUCATION.A COMPARISON OF AMERICAN MEDICAL COLLEGE WORK WITH THAT OF EUROPEAN MEDICAL SCHOOLS. INCLUDING SOME THOUGHTS UPON FREE TRADE IN MEDICAL DIPLOMAS OF FOREIGN MANUFACTURE. Read in the Section of State Medicine at the Forty-first Annual Meeting of the American Medical Association, held at Nashville, Tenn., May, 1890.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE IN THE COOPER MEDICAL COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO. AUTHOR OF "A HAND-BOOK OF MATERIA MEDICA," ETC. "QUIZCOMPENDS OF ANATOMY AND MATERIA MEDICA," "SPEECH AND ITS DEFECTS," "AN INDEX OF COMPARATIVE THERAPEUTICS," ETC.

JAMA. 1890;XV(3):81-91. doi:10.1001/jama.1890.02410290001001
Abstract

Any American physician who is thrown into the society of European medical men, either at home or abroad, cannot fail to become sensible of a feeling of contempt for American medical education and persons, which pervades the European to such an extent that, polite as he may be, he is never able to wholly disguise it. This sentiment is most freely exhibited by medical immigrants to this country, by gentlemen who come here to settle after having received a foreign medical degree or diploma; and many who show it most offensively are Americans by birth though of foreign parentage, who have been sent abroad for their medical education. If hailing from the German or Austro-Hungarian empires, the diplomas possessed by these gentlemen do not qualify them to practice medicine in the countries where they were obtained; for not one in a thousand of such medical immigrants possesses the

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